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What did you do with your GMT400 today...or yesterday....

MrMarty51

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Miles City, Montana
I did change oil, filter and fuel filter on the K3500. Been changing fuel filter every other oil change, probably not necessary but I do not wanna have tostop and deal with a plugged filter mid trip somewhere. Not that I ever go any place. LOL
 

Big T

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Fullerton, CA
Lmk if you find it. Wifes 07 yota fj cruiser has it too. 126,000 on it.
I think I found it. The nuts on the Lower Control Arms need to be torqued to 120 lbs. I torqued the rears and the one on the passenger side needed several strokes of the torque wrench before clicking. A quick test in the driveway and the “dunk” noise was no longer there. Prior to torquing, the driveway was sufficient to generate the noise.
 

MrMarty51

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Location
Miles City, Montana
I think I found it. The nuts on the Lower Control Arms need to be torqued to 120 lbs. I torqued the rears and the one on the passenger side needed several strokes of the torque wrench before clicking. A quick test in the driveway and the “dunk” noise was no longer there. Prior to torquing, the driveway was sufficient to generate the noise.
Has Me wondering.
Why are 6.2/6.5 diesel owners such good problem solvers ? LOL
Could probably start a thread dedicated to this subject. LOL
 

Big T

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Fullerton, CA
Has Me wondering.
Why are 6.2/6.5 diesel owners such good problem solvers ? LOL
Could probably start a thread dedicated to this subject. LOL
Honestly, the recommendation to torqued the LCA nuts came from Toyota-4Runner.org forum. Really the first real repair advice I’ve gotten there. If you want advice about skid plates, rock sliders, winch bumpers. Plasti dipping Toyota emblems, tires, shocks, lift kits for the 4Runner, there is no better place to go. Just don’t expect good repair advice.
 

Big T

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Fullerton, CA
Has Me wondering.
Why are 6.2/6.5 diesel owners such good problem solvers ? LOL
Could probably start a thread dedicated to this subject. LOL
I'll give you one good reason: GM design forced us 6.2/6.5 owners to become problem solvers, else we'd be sitting on our ass at home with no wheels.

The Toyota 4Runner has few if any design problems. So the Forum guys end up arguing over whether you can use 75w90 Synthetic versus Toyota spec 75w gear oil in the transfer case. Supporters of Toyota 75w spec lube oil ($30 to $60 per quart) persist, despite the transfer case manufacturer saying there should be no problem. Toyota 75w spec supporters sleep comfortably at night knowing they're compliant after just 40K miles on their truck. Meanwhile, we're at 165K miles using Mobil Delvac Synther 75w90, Yawn.
 

Will L.

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Boulder City Nv
Ordered a new driver’s interior door handle for the Burb. 6* this morning and the sucker just snapped off! View attachment 55253 View attachment 55254
Gone through 2 of them on the driver's side already.
This was a really common repair we did in fleet. We got to where we could Notice ones that were slightly bent. We would stock one in the parts room. If a person is at a junkyard wondering what else they could grab for $2 that might be worth a spare, start examining them and you’ll be able to judge which are not bending already.

The material used isn’t the strongest and is amplified by technique of opening the door we figured out. People that use right hand to pull handle and left hand or arm to push open the door never have them bend or brake. But many drivers (myself included) would push out with the left elbow while left fingertips pull out on handle. As the door opens the use of the arm as a lever to swing the door open maxes out the handle throw and applies pressure while the handle is pulled out causing alot more stress on it.

But it usually take about 150,000 miles worth of one person doing this to cause it. Kinda surprised I don’t hear more about it online.
 

Big T

Well-Known Member
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Location
Fullerton, CA
This was a really common repair we did in fleet. We got to where we could Notice ones that were slightly bent. We would stock one in the parts room. If a person is at a junkyard wondering what else they could grab for $2 that might be worth a spare, start examining them and you’ll be able to judge which are not bending already.

The material used isn’t the strongest and is amplified by technique of opening the door we figured out. People that use right hand to pull handle and left hand or arm to push open the door never have them bend or brake. But many drivers (myself included) would push out with the left elbow while left fingertips pull out on handle. As the door opens the use of the arm as a lever to swing the door open maxes out the handle throw and applies pressure while the handle is pulled out causing alot more stress on it.

But it usually take about 150,000 miles worth of one person doing this to cause it.
Add in sticky doors from worn hinge pins and lock latches. Then you have to use left elbow and bump the door open. Yes, the first one goes at 150K. The second one will go at 200K, unless you fix the sticky door issues.
 
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