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6.5l injection timing

Trucker2k16

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Im gonna use the arp thread lube i just got off phone with the mechanic the installed mine he used 30w oil but since im redoing mine ima go with the arp thread lube and tge optimum black permatex and torque in 3 steps would i go 30 60 90 then 100?
 

Will L.

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The 30/60/90 is because the 90 is last
Known tourque on TTY BOLTS before the 90 degree turn that you will NOT DO on studs.

Any time you torque anything, you split it in roughly thirds.
So 35,70,100 is ok. Some psycho ocd guys like me actually go 34/67/100.
Also remember you should “warm” the torque wrench on a different bolt first. Like the bolts holding block to stand are way over 34. So set to first level, go do 5 cycles of it clicking
To torque that first, then swap socket and start the torque process.

Doing 30/60/90/100 probably wouldn’t hurt anything, but that 90-100 is hard to get accurate moving that small amount at that high torque. The head moving down in equal amounts is key
 

Trucker2k16

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The 30/60/90 is because the 90 is last
Known tourque on TTY BOLTS before the 90 degree turn that you will NOT DO on studs.

Any time you torque anything, you split it in roughly thirds.
So 35,70,100 is ok. Some psycho ocd guys like me actually go 34/67/100.
Also remember you should “warm” the torque wrench on a different bolt first. Like the bolts holding block to stand are way over 34. So set to first level, go do 5 cycles of it clicking
To torque that first, then swap socket and start the torque process.

Doing 30/60/90/100 probably wouldn’t hurt anything, but that 90-100 is hard to get accurate moving that small amount at that high torque. The head moving down in equal amounts is key
The ones on this engine was torqued with 30w oil and when i checked torque it came to 130 so i guess ima have to go back to 130 any less would mess up the gaskets i think
 

Will L.

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Oh. I thought you were replacing the gaskets.
You still have all the hang on ls on the front of the heads I imagine then?
I am gonna push you to just doing 2 new gaskets while there. Another days work and $40-$50 more but it is the safer answer.

The motor oil has lower drag coefficient (not as slippery) as the ARP lube. 100 with ARP is same as 130 with motor oil on threads.
If you have to reuse the headgaskets, I would be tempted to bump the torque UP for a tad more squish. The 100 using ARP lube is a safe number with room for error. I suspect @ak diesel driver is meaning his 110 is with arp not oil? Something you should consider imo.
 

Trucker2k16

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Id like to do both gaskets just worried about the one stud near firewall and really dont want to pull the motor out i have all the gaskets on hand even the 4021 mahle headgaskets but i understand that you have to slide heads over studs now i wish before i put it in i redid them i learnt not to 100% not to trust someones work
 

WarWagon

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Pulled the engine every time. I do not think the head would go over the stud due to hitting the firewall. We took a hard look at it before pulling the engine this time. The studs have to come out with head on (clear) because they are not much longer than head bolts. So stud removal and firewall clearance is not a problem.

Exotic idea I have seen suggested would be removing engine mounts and pulling engine/trans forward in frame to get it to clear.

Advantage to not using a thread locker for me will be not pulling an engine for head work.
 

ak diesel driver

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You can remove the studs to pull the head but you'll have to leave the nut on the rear stud and let it come out with the head. Same for going back on put that rear stud in the head first and then put head on
 

Will L.

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I stole a chart from the folks at nordlock that explains why always lubricating threads give more consistant applied torque as well as increases the applied torque with better lubricity on the thread increases the measured linear applied force to the object being secured.
1549121173232.jpeg

(So also learn, when dry or wet torque is allowed- always choose wet, it is more consistent)

The average increase in applied force is substantial dry vs wet. The better lubricated one applied more holding power. The more lubricated it is the more slippery the threads.

Imagine if you cover the threads in silica sand and tried it. It would be much harder to turn the torque wrench, even with no clamping force as in before the nut hits the washer. it might take 50lbs of force just to turn the nut before it even touches the washer, so the applied force is far less.

The arp lube compared to motor oil is so slippery that it takes exactly 30% more rotating force to apply the same amount of linear force.

Keep In mind tightening a bolt or nut is like the rear axle in your truck not just changing direction, but has a gear ratio.
Corse threads are like 2.73, and fine is like 4.11.
Think of a rearend that is full of chunky crappy 90 year old gear oil and you are towing 100,000# trailer with your pickup truck and it can only get to 5 mph max. That engine works hard to turn the tires. Now, what happens if you loose the gear oil and the gears get chewed up? The engine was maxed before, same power in engine, but now you only get 1 mph because of the extra work load from the added friction in the gears.
What if, before the gears were damaged, you change the clumpy junk oil with some nasa engineered oil that is crazy slippery? Now you get 6 mph instead of 5 because better lubriation turns a higher percentage of the applied force into actual work.

A good experiment is take a scrap piece of thick plywood- maybe 3/4” thick- but Not a 2x4, the wood grain ruins it.
Put the plywood in a vice.
Drill 3 holes and Use 1/2” bolt and nuts through it with flat washers on only the nut sides, allowing the head of the bolt to sink into the wood.
Leave 1 dry. Use motor oil on one bolt. Use arp lube on the third.

Use your torque wrench and watch how much difference the 3 have squishing the washer into the wood. Do it in steps, 10 lbs at a time.
 

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