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Oil accumulator/ pre oiler

Will L.

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Thread starter #1
On another thread by Greenmeanie, I brought up maybe using an oil accumulator and or pre oiler.

I dont think an accumulator for harsh driving like in racing is super needed, but maybe wouldn’t hurt off road. Some accumulators can be set up as pre oiler also.

Pre oilers are good for about any engine. I have been wanting one on my hummer, but haven’t figured out details yet. I know they would be ideal for many 6.5s that are not daily drivers, because the longer an engine sits unran, worse dry start up is. And let’s face it, oil pressure is not one of our bragging rights.

Hoping to get a 100 psi @ 60 gpm external oil pump to drive a centrifuge for oil cleaning has been also on back burner, and if ever happens could easily be tied in as pre oiler also, but if that doesn’t happen...

Anyone here have systems on any 6.2/6.5? Anything on other rigs?

Love to hear input and learn more about them.
 

Will L.

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@ak diesel driver Can you tell more about it, good and bad?

Here is the Moroso one. With it, electric valve, hose, and “T” fitting to tie into oil cooler hose above filter probably $350ish

The use of the electric valve (or cable operated manual valve, but to hackish for me) on the accumulator that gets wired to ignition power. So you turn on key, and while glow plugs cycle, accumulator dumps the 2 quarts into the oil galleys and all the bearings, lifters, etc. Then when it starts it will refill once good oil pressure in the entire engine.

Then anytime you have a dip in oil pressure like hard corners, on ramps, or heavy angles off road, the accumulator dumps its oil into engine as needed all automatic based on oil pressure.

 
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#4
Mine is the kind that doesn't have a tank. Works pretty well but won't have the off-road features you want. Also nice that you can prime with a push of a button no matter how long it's been sitting.
 

Will L.

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Haha, yeah funny how popular they were long ago then just kinda fade away. Back in 2000 i would have figured every car/truck that is above average price would come stock with it.
 

FellowTraveler

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#9
On another thread by Greenmeanie, I brought up maybe using an oil accumulator and or pre oiler.

I dont think an accumulator for harsh driving like in racing is super needed, but maybe wouldn’t hurt off road. Some accumulators can be set up as pre oiler also.

Pre oilers are good for about any engine. I have been wanting one on my hummer, but haven’t figured out details yet. I know they would be ideal for many 6.5s that are not daily drivers, because the longer an engine sits unran, worse dry start up is. And let’s face it, oil pressure is not one of our bragging rights.

Hoping to get a 100 psi @ 60 gpm external oil pump to drive a centrifuge for oil cleaning has been also on back burner, and if ever happens could easily be tied in as pre oiler also, but if that doesn’t happen...

Anyone here have systems on any 6.2/6.5? Anything on other rigs?

Love to hear input and learn more about them.
There are a few aftermarket centrifuge systems with 12v pump attached to drive the centrifuge at speeds needed for maintaining cleaner oil....then there is the compressor driven type that can be tasked to spin the air driven centrifuge.
 

Will L.

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Thread starter #10
There are a few aftermarket centrifuge systems with 12v pump attached to drive the centrifuge at speeds needed for maintaining cleaner oil....then there is the compressor driven type that can be tasked to spin the air driven centrifuge.
Can you please send me links? I have never seen 12v pumps that can supply that amount.

I know running a cf as bypass filtration off even 35 psi will clean the oil more than just running a filter. But I am quite familiar with the cf that Leroy sells. Bought my first one of those (from another supplier) back in ‘04ish. It can processes 55 gpm at 95 psi and spins the rotor at just a hair over 9,500 rpm. Infact, starting about 35 psi it is almost linear 1 psi=1,000 rpm rotor speed. At a bit over 9,000 rpm, That will seperate 0.1 micron. You will litteraly remove 100% of the soot. That is why I want to push it that high pressure, and be able to feed at that rate. A task loop and secondary oil can will be needed.

I say say 60gpm and 100psi as room for error figures.
 

Will L.

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Correction. .92 gpm - what the heck was I thinking? 55 gph- wow what a difference.

I also looked at my notes on the psi:rpm. 85psi=7500 rpm and correct on my target of 95 psi= 9500 rpm.

Soot: 99.9% of soot is 2.5 Micron. No soot is smaller than 1 miron.
 

Will L.

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@FellowTraveler
Thank you, I will chase down the articles and try to find what oil pump they use, and see what it’s specs are. Iirc I had to have a 120v 1/4 hp motor to drive pump.

I will still just refresh my old cf or buy a new one from Leroy if mine is done. 2 reasons- #1 support our vendor and #2 see the fyi

The manufacturer is possibly same one Leroy’s are made by. There are only a few companies alotted the production rights off the patent for this design, and it is a trust that holds the patent since the 90’s that I am aware of.


The fyi- the diesel craft article tied in there has some misinformation. A 4” centrifuge at 6000 rpm can not remove to 1 micron. Way short of it. There is a formula (that I can never remember) that takes size of cf and rpm (along with couple viscous and weight factors) to determine maximum possible micron.
Also where they say “.0048 oz for every gallon of diesel fuel burned...” They are pulling info from somewhere and using it as ad information poorly. What engine, with how much blow by, with exacy what fuel? Heck, winter blend changes that figure dramatically in the same engine under same test conditions.
Also I watched their YouTube video with the window cut out. His psi:rpm is way off. There are others that they copied that method of showing it from that use a tachometer and pressure gauge to show it. Funny thing is I think those 2 companies are in cahoots, interesting they didn’t share the specs.

I am not out to bash them, nothing for or against them. But a person could win a lawsuit from that misinformation advertising hands down. Buy that set up and run it at 6,000 rpm. Then do the post spin micron count and it is gauruntee fail. Physics doesn’t lie.
I have a hard time supporting a company that will put out misinformation on the side of make the sale instead of just say “I don’t know” - which Leroy did btw. Saying low enough pressure to only get 6,000 rpm will remove to smaller than 1 micron is tricking people into thinking that set up should remove all contamination to 1 micron. They even go so far as to use the normal media filters variable to look that much better. But I can tell you, 4” can at 6,000 rpm and a cheap spin on filter will do better. Having it as a
Secondary along with a spin on, 6,000 rpm will catch some that gets through the spin on, but not better by itself.

If you are after the soot, ensure the pump set up you get can hit 90 psi with that cf.

Working at the fuel company I had to use it with centrifuge testing multiple times a day. Soot was one of the items we had to chase since we were using pyrolysis to create the oils and fuels.

Having owned this lil 4” unit before, I knew it was capable of near 9500 rpm before hitting it’s harmonic limit. So I did the math and realized just a hair over 90 psi would do 100% seperation by consummation pass.

Mass production tolerances would make an exact psi impossible to know, and wear would affect it also- so plan on higher psi is my result.
 

Will L.

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Thread starter #17
@n8in8or do you miss the restriction of exhaust flow from the gm turbo, and feeling nostalgic?

A belt driven pump can be done. Maybe I’ll look into that again but not focused on power steering pumps this time. I can’t believe a 100 psi pump is so expensive everywhere. I might go back to the pump on the old one I had that got messed up years ago.
 

Will L.

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The only a/c motor I know that drives it is a 1/3 hp. All that I seen are Too big to fit. I barely have room to stuff in the cf.

The pump needed is small- about the size of engine oil pump without pickup tube. So I was thinking use that size pump and rigging to a pulley and fitting it somewhere like you would a secondary alternator. Then just need pressure regulator & bypass the excess when rpm raises.

The ford guys with the oil pressure bumped injectors (heui iirc) could just tap that circuit and be in high heaven.
 
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