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Additives.

btfarm

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For lubricity, good ole biodiesel is best.
Add about 1 gallon per fillup.
Been running B5-B20 since new. Almost 100% BIO in illinois... We are, after all, one of the biggest soybean producers... But in winter it's likely no higher than 5 because BIO gels much easier and why every tank gets additive when temps are below 30.
 

WarWagon

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For lubricity, good ole biodiesel is best.
Add about 1 gallon per fillup.
But it has disadvantage of adsorbing water and little known bug risk. Boaters try and avoid it for this reason. Good clean dry diesel is a fing joke in this country where lack of good filters and water separators has brought many OEM passinger car and pickup diesels to the shop for expensive repairs. At the owners expense. The Olds 5.7 was a good example, lacking even a WIF light at first, bringing on lemon laws and the big 3 did nothing to improve filters like big rigs had and have.

If you run over 5% bio you need a better water separator. Yeah from OEM the need is there just more so with bio.
 

btfarm

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A B5 to B20 blend of soy pumped into MILLIONS of trucks of all sizes here in Illinois for the last 10+ years with virtually NO problems says BS on your analysis WW. Maybe in AZ but uh uh here.
 
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RI Chevy Silveradoman

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I run B99 quite often. I have had zero water in my fuel filters when I change them. I use tall can spin on filters.
I also run fuel supplement in every tank.
I also sometimes run a custom mix of Bio fuel and #2 diesel and have had no issues.
 

red

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Both petroleum diesel and biodiesel attract water, not a unique problem. They are equally at risk of the black slime as well (from sitting for extended periods with perfect climate conditions), which is not common.

Better filters than stock is something that I'd consider mandatory with any engine you want to get a long lifespan out of. Manufacturers spec the filters to get the mechanical components to last to the end of the warranty period or expected lifespan (10 years).
 

Will L.

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Both petroleum diesel and biodiesel attract water, not a unique problem. They are equally at risk of the black slime as well (from sitting for extended periods with perfect climate conditions), which is not common.

Better filters than stock is something that I'd consider mandatory with any engine you want to get a long lifespan out of. Manufacturers spec the filters to get the mechanical components to last to the end of the warranty period or expected lifespan (10 years).
This first part is completely incorrect. The phrase opposites like oil and water... petroleum diesel is oil- a specific grade of it.

If you take petroleum diesel that has not had an emulsifier added to it and add any percentage of water. You can mix them up with a blender. Then simply let them sit. The water will seperate from the diesel at a level of 99.5 percent based on temperature/ dew point/ relative humidity.

If you heat it to 195*f it will seperate at a level of 99.999%

It is only since the reduction of sulfur in the fuel and the related btu drop that the addition of alcohols into diesel fuels became “normal”. These alcohols added soley for the bump in power emulsifies the water into the fuel. The higher the content of emulsifiers in the fuel the more water it will absorb both in mass and proportion.

I have been out to make equipment purchases from oil mining and refineries in Northern Nv that had trace amount (to scale) in massive tanks and equipment. We wereallowed to have about 40 gallons of #2 diesel that was produced back in the late 90’s. That location got deep snow, and descent humidity. Condensation in the tank had water sitting with the puddles of diesel, but was fully seperated. We used the old fuel for some testing practice. Being that old in the presence of water had no effect because of the high levels of sulfur.
 

WarWagon

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A B5 to B20 blend of soy pumped into MILLIONS of trucks of all sizes here in Illinois for the last 10+ years with virtually NO problems says BS on your analysis WW. Maybe in AZ but uh uh here.
My advice is FREE. The cost to me to provide this advice was very expensive in ruined injection systems including fuel tanks. Are you contributing to my filter, filters, filters, (did I mention the pile of clogged filters?) fuel tank, injection pump, lift pump, and injector replacement fund from using B99? Engine manufactures like Cummins in years past offer governments the ability to run B20 vs. B5 simply with the addition of an additional water separator. I have seen #2 diesel added to "wet" B99 drop the water out of it. A dry water separator means you have been lucky and got dry diesel/bio or you have enough bio in the mix to simply push the water through the separator in suspension.

Let me say this again: no WIF light on B99 that was ruining the fuel system. The second I added #2 diesel, because I had burned the wet B99 up or so I thought from erroneous fuel level sensor failure/corosion, finally the WIF light did come on from the water suddenly dropping out of the now ~B50 mix. As I posted before the injection system that lived through B99 had and additional CAT water separator on it while the fuel tank had to be replaced.

Diesel fuel with bio can have a low six month storage life. https://www.yachtingmonthly.com/sailing-skills/how-to-avoid-diesel-bug-32632

Just because millions get away with it doesn't mean it can't have problems. In fact there are problems posted up here and there from the millions that have used it if you bothered to look it up. Good luck with that search BTW as most people are clueless about it including Biodiesel suppliers. The lack of any information what-so-ever isn't BS: It's a Public Service Announcement from me. Now go over to sail boat forums and explain to them how Biodiesel is rainbows and unicorns. I DOUBLE DOG DARE YOU! I bet they won't be as nice because they have has extreme problems with the hygroscopic nature of biodiesel combined with the bugs in fuel that result. They avoid Biodiesel like the plague it is to them noting the above referenced article.

At the end of they day the Ignorance on the Biodiesel trouble topic is all I am trying to solve. Someone with a fuel problem may have a better time getting answers if they come across my posts on the subject. Without answers the damage gets worse in mere HOURS as the bug population doubles. Yes, it has good things about it, but, clean dry fuel is not always true and it's especially more of a problem when the fuel can suspend enough water to grow bugs in it rather than what we are used to from past 1980's era diesel: bugs growing only at the fuel water layer. Pickup a gas station cover after a good rain and see how much water in in there. Fuel truck drivers refuse to fill at times because of it being full of rainwater...

Again if you want to run biodiesel the best thing you can do is add an additional water separator that's rated for biodiesel. Want is becoming "have-to" due to government allowing less than 5% blends to be unlabeled and 20% up to B100 at the pumps. (B99 is generaly the max to get the blending tax credit.) Use it properly and avoid it's problems means you simply can't assume what you know about 1980's era diesel applies to it.

I haven't touched post injection (for DPF) oil contamination, Gelling (your engine stops) at higher temps, higher NOX emissions that's somehow EPA Ok for Bio but not for VW, reduced MPG by 10% depending on blend, incompatible yellow metals...

Yep, all Rainbows and Unicorns.
 
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RI Chevy Silveradoman

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My WIF filter and assembly was deleted way long ago, as I run a CAT 1R0750 in the rear and a CAT 1R0749 in the front replacing the OEM Filter. Every time I change the filters, I religiously pour the fuel from the filter into a 2 liter empty plastic soda bottle that is clear. I wait a few days for everything to settle and check for water. I also cut the filter tops off and check the inside of the can for any rust. So its a double check if you would. I never see any water inside my fuel.
I must be lucky living up here near the ocean. Just mentioning it in passing.
 

red

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This first part is completely incorrect. The phrase opposites like oil and water... petroleum diesel is oil- a specific grade of it.

If you take petroleum diesel that has not had an emulsifier added to it and add any percentage of water. You can mix them up with a blender. Then simply let them sit. The water will seperate from the diesel at a level of 99.5 percent based on temperature/ dew point/ relative humidity.

If you heat it to 195*f it will seperate at a level of 99.999%

It is only since the reduction of sulfur in the fuel and the related btu drop that the addition of alcohols into diesel fuels became “normal”. These alcohols added soley for the bump in power emulsifies the water into the fuel. The higher the content of emulsifiers in the fuel the more water it will absorb both in mass and proportion.

I have been out to make equipment purchases from oil mining and refineries in Northern Nv that had trace amount (to scale) in massive tanks and equipment. We wereallowed to have about 40 gallons of #2 diesel that was produced back in the late 90’s. That location got deep snow, and descent humidity. Condensation in the tank had water sitting with the puddles of diesel, but was fully seperated. We used the old fuel for some testing practice. Being that old in the presence of water had no effect because of the high levels of sulfur.
You realize your post to 'disagree' with my statement actually agreed with it, right? I'm not talking about non ULSD #2 diesel since that is not available at the pump in the US. ULSD, as you stated yourself, has similar water issues as biodiesel.
 
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