• Welcome to The Truck Stop! We see you haven't REGISTERED yet.

    Your truck knowledge is missing!
    • Registration is FREE , all we need is your birthday and email. (We don't share ANY data with ANYONE)
    • We have tons of knowledge here for your diesel truck!
    • Post your own topics and reply to existing threads to help others out!
    • NO ADS! The site is fully functional and ad free!
    CLICK HERE TO REGISTER!

    Problems registering? Click here to contact us!

    Already registered, but need a PASSWORD RESET? CLICK HERE TO RESET YOUR PASSWORD!

Additives.

JayTheCPA

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,857
Reaction score
1,446
Location
Annapolis, MD
There is a difference in what you need, versus what you might add.

Pre 2007 diesels will need a lubricant for the fuel. From the picture, it looks like you fall into this group with an indirect diesel injection (IDI) motor. For the 6.5's (which are IDI's), at a minimum lube is beneficial for the injectors and maybe for the injection pump (IP). Reason for the comment about maybe beneficial for the IP is that it is possible to get new ULSD compliant IP's. Even with ULSD complainant IP's, I am not aware that anybody designed ULSD compliant injectors for the 6.5.

Weather (specifically, temperature) is another factor as to whether additive is necessary. Depending where in PA you live, you might need additive to keep the fuel from gelling in the winter. Again, this is another maybe item as it depends on other factors like whether the fuel filter has a working heater and how cold the fuel gets. Best thing is to search on diesel fuel gelling and understand how this works.

In terms of which additive brands to use, there are a number of them that do the job, so search a bit on this as well.
 

btfarm

340,000 Worth and counting
Staff member
Lead Moderator
Messages
17,179
Reaction score
3,766
Location
Sandwich, Illinois
Most suppliers gauge the weather and blend to keep fuel from gelling. Never hurts to add a little for your own peace of mind. For lubricity, B5 to B20 blends like we have in Illinois are good but again, another additive of your choice sure wont hurt.
 

MrMarty51

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,985
Reaction score
2,731
Location
Miles City, Montana
Most suppliers gauge the weather and blend to keep fuel from gelling. Never hurts to add a little for your own peace of mind. For lubricity, B5 to B20 blends like we have in Illinois are good but again, another additive of your choice sure wont hurt.
Over here, the pumps say additives added to be good to five degrees or some such, I see too many big rigs stalled along the road and the service truck setting there with the mechanics changing fuel filters. something I will avoid at all costs. LOL
Temps here will drop into the 20 and 30 below quite regularly during the winter months. Coldest I have been through according to the radio station was 49 below, unofficially but on one of those remote weather stations that is put out by the U.S. weather service was 56 below, back in about 1979 over at Plevna Montana where I was living at the time, old dodge van felt like riding on lumber, seats was cold and tires thumped the 22 miles to work. LOL
 

BIGR

Lucky To Be Here
Messages
6,767
Reaction score
6,530
Location
Appalachian Mountains
I ran Stanadyne Performance Formula for years and then switched to Opti-Lube XPD, not sure which one is the best the Opti-Lube had some great test results if they were accurate.

I wouldn't mind to get some Power Service and try it since I would not have to order it. I have to order the Opti-Lube like a carton or case at a time to come out cheaper. Do you guys think the Power Service is pretty good, I suppose it would be better than no additives?
 

btfarm

340,000 Worth and counting
Staff member
Lead Moderator
Messages
17,179
Reaction score
3,766
Location
Sandwich, Illinois
I have used Power Service for well past 400k and over 330k on this truck on original pump and injectors still. Is there better? Maybe...I have been tempted to try others but I can't see why I should.

Marty, We've only seen gelling trouble here once in the last few years when we got a spell below -20° for a week some years back. Semis gelled up on the side of the road around here are usually those that fueled up down south.
 

RI Chevy Silveradoman

At your service
Staff member
Lead Moderator
Messages
11,355
Reaction score
3,015
Location
Rhode Island
Same for me Mike on the gelling. Only gelled twice, and it was -10 out. I think it may have been more icing than gelling.
I got it home and used a blow dryer on the filter. Ran perfect after that.
I wonder if someone makes a cordless heat gun?
 

Will L.

Well-Known Member
Messages
9,584
Reaction score
10,728
Location
Boulder City Nv
The big problem with a lot of those is they are emulsifiers.

So as long as there is no water present, it is ok. But as soon as any water at all is there- a very humid day and a half tank of fuel- it just soaked in waterand the water even i suspension tears the hell out of ip and injectors.
So all the “good” the lube added, it just did years of wear in a day.
 
Top