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Timing Cover Gasket???

Big T

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Was doing a 6.5 closeout buy on intake manifold gaskets that I need for when I replace the injection pump on the '94 Suburban. They show a timing cover gasket set. Do I need one, or is that just sealed with The Good Stuff?
 

Will L.

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I always just used right stuff.

I have even used the right stuff instead of intake gasket, but that is more effort to remove later, so a asket there is easier.

Keep in mind if using gear drive instead of timing chain- you need the gasket for proper spacing.
 

Big T

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I always just used right stuff.

I have even used the right stuff instead of intake gasket, but that is more effort to remove later, so a asket there is easier.

Keep in mind if using gear drive instead of timing chain- you need the gasket for proper spacing.
Trying to remember, is there a gasket that goes behind the IP?
 

Will L.

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I usually use that gasket, because timing chain stretches causes timing adjustment about every 30,000 miles, at least 50,000. I put right stuff really thin on side against cover so it doesn’t move and side against ip I leave dry.

If you go dry both sides it will tear when you adjust timing later.

I did it several times with no gasket and only thin layer of right stuff. It didn’t leak, even after timing readjustment, but is hard to break free for re-timing.
I also did a super thin layer and let it dry in the open air. That worked ok but I didn’t get to see hoe that worked out long term. It worked past one timing adjustment, but I left the outfit shortly after that, so don’t onow the long term results.
 

Big T

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I usually use that gasket, because timing chain stretches causes timing adjustment about every 30,000 miles, at least 50,000. I put right stuff really thin on side against cover so it doesn’t move and side against ip I leave dry.

If you go dry both sides it will tear when you adjust timing later.

I did it several times with no gasket and only thin layer of right stuff. It didn’t leak, even after timing readjustment, but is hard to break free for re-timing.
I also did a super thin layer and let it dry in the open air. That worked ok but I didn’t get to see hoe that worked out long term. It worked past one timing adjustment, but I left the outfit shortly after that, so don’t onow the long term results.
Timing adjustment? Please explain.
 

Will L.

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Db2 requires moving the ip to change timing.
Ds4 can be done with computer to an extent, then once limit is reached, physical movement of the ip is required along with computer timing.

This occurs as the timing chain stretches.
You must compensate for it. Periodically checking actual timing.
That is why Leroy chose to call his gear drive “Time Keeper”. It solves the problem. With solid gears like all quality Diesel engines are built with keeps the timing accurate.

Stretched timing chains beyond the specifications is one of the ways valves and pistons smack each other.

Chain slap is one of the things that causes chatter to the ip wearing it out quicker.

If you are putting a new set of gears and chain on the 200,000 mile engine, thats ok. Just know that around 230k, 260k, and 290k you should expect readjustments in ip timing. Sooner if you work it harder or getting more city driving vs hiway. More frequent or more forceful acceleration/deceleration stretches the chain faster.

Solid timing gears = no timing adjustments after it is set the first time. I see it as $ spent now to save labor and aggravation later, and the longer ip life is a bonus.
The db2 on ford idi is same unit except 3/8 fuel inlet, reverse direction, and driven by gears instead of a chain. Their average life span is 25% more. Correlation doesn’t equal causation, but having seen similar thing in semi Diesel engines is enough proof to me. Thats why I bought mine.
 

Big T

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Db2 requires moving the ip to change timing.
Ds4 can be done with computer to an extent, then once limit is reached, physical movement of the ip is required along with computer timing.

This occurs as the timing chain stretches.
You must compensate for it. Periodically checking actual timing.
That is why Leroy chose to call his gear drive “Time Keeper”. It solves the problem. With solid gears like all quality Diesel engines are built with keeps the timing accurate.

Stretched timing chains beyond the specifications is one of the ways valves and pistons smack each other.

Chain slap is one of the things that causes chatter to the ip wearing it out quicker.

If you are putting a new set of gears and chain on the 200,000 mile engine, thats ok. Just know that around 230k, 260k, and 290k you should expect readjustments in ip timing. Sooner if you work it harder or getting more city driving vs hiway. More frequent or more forceful acceleration/deceleration stretches the chain faster.

Solid timing gears = no timing adjustments after it is set the first time. I see it as $ spent now to save labor and aggravation later, and the longer ip life is a bonus.
The db2 on ford idi is same unit except 3/8 fuel inlet, reverse direction, and driven by gears instead of a chain. Their average life span is 25% more. Correlation doesn’t equal causation, but having seen similar thing in semi Diesel engines is enough proof to me. Thats why I bought mine.
Thank you for that reply which was delivered in a way that a neophyte can understand.

This is my son's '94 K2500 Suburban. I'm putting in Cloyes Chain and gears, AC Delco HD and Pulley. The engine has 290K miles on it and the vehicle was bought with 240K miles on it. It has blowby, but runs strong. We have a back-up engine with 185K miles on it that came from a '95 K2500 Suburban that he had flipped. That spare engine ran strong and has been stored in a military crate. It will eventually go into the '94 Suburban and It has an IP on it with about 60K miles on it, which I will be swapping to the current engine.

The current engine runs strong, but has blowby. It is a back up vehicle. We intend to drive it until the engine dies and then put the back up engine in. I will consider gears and Fluidampner for that engine. I'm doing all the work because he's busy with 4.5 and 2.5 year old kids. I've also picked up all the parts because my wife says it's a tax free way to transfer our estate.

I've changed the timing chain and gears on my 1999. Trying to remember, do I need to pull out the radiator for clearance?
 

Will L.

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I suggest an oil change and oil prime the old engine going into storage before storing. Acids from the used oil eats things up, and is worth the hassle of using an oil primer to pump it through the journals. Just empty and refill the old filter on it now. Also seal all holes on the engine, intake, exhaust, oil ports, water ports, etc.

If you are keeping the worn out ip coming off the higher engine for later rebuilding- get some nondetergent 10wt oil, and feed it through the ip rotating it. If you do it on truck, just disconnect injector lines and try to start it with oil feeding inlet. Modern diesel fuel is corrosive also and storing even a brand new pump with trace amounts of crappy new diesel can do damage sitting over a few years.

On removing radiator- I always do. The little amount of time required for it and how much easier it is to do everything plus not risking damage is well worth it imo.
If the coolant isnt that old- just catch and reuse it.
 

Pruittx2

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with a tad over 200k on my 95, and an ip that after june 1st,, needs a bottle of water poured on it to start, I have sourced a new rebuilt with a few thou miles on it, as a replacement. So looking at going it for that, I thought chain and gears,, maybe all new buttons for rockers, and valve cover gaskets, would be a good bet. Not looking forward to the job at all, it'll be my first diesel ip. I do have a bud here in town, ex military that can do 6.5 ip swaps in his sleep. Looks like a case of beer is in order!
 
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