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Tire Pressure Monitoring System (TPMS) Review

Taylor90

New Member
Messages
6
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9
Location
New Jersey
Thread starter #1
I have been convinced that TireMinder A1A is the best TPMS for RV. I bought this for our travel trailer for piece of mind while travelling. I have not needed to use the provided signal booster with my Chevy 2500HD and 26' travel trailer. My unit reads out in the exact pressure and temperature of each tire. Audible alarms are great as well as providing visual queues. Warnings are set for over pressure limits and under pressure limits so that an alarm sounds if a tire is in trouble. The sensors are flow through so that air may be added to the tire without removing the sensor. Battery time is great and auto-powers down after a period of inactivity. Any other good options when it comes to TPMS?
 

Taylor90

New Member
Messages
6
Likes
9
Location
New Jersey
Thread starter #3
Another option I would like to recommend is EEZTIRE T515. I read the review about this RV tire pressure monitoring system on an outdoor blog I follow daily (here) and found out that this system is even easier to setup than TireMinder A1A. Just follow the manual and link the sensors before you install them. Since they screw on you will lose a bit of air. The security feature works as long as you don't use the wrench but you need to remove them before checking or filling a tire. You can install then without the security casing to make it easier to remove if you want. I did not try the flow through sensors as they are a little too long for my application and security isn't really secure. You even do not need a booster. The display is a bit small but all of these units have small displays. This system is less expensive than others available and seems to work well. One more good point of this system is that it has a long sensor battery life.
 

Will L.

Well-Known Member
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6,859
Location
Boulder City Nv
#4
I found it funny (not in a haha way) that the original law for mandating tpms wa to be for commercial trucks, class 7&8, semi and trailers since the majority of injury and death according to national hiway safety folks was from them being low on pressure or blowing out. In step the lawyers and lobyists, then the law gets rewritten to be mandated for passenger vehicles and commercial vehicles and everything over certain weight are excluded. I like the safety idea, weight/ mass being a reason to exclude seems counter productive. SMH

Good to see someone wanting to put them on their RV. Many people disable them on their cars and trucks due to annoyance and cost involved. I didn't even realize aftermarket units are even available.

Since my Hummer has CTIS, central tire inflation system, I and most other Hummer owners can inflate or deflate on the fly. I thought an onboard compressor to all vehicles, with ctis and a control system of tpms would be good. Then whenever tires are a little low it auto inflates and the driver should only get a warning light if excessive airing up is occurring. Most people ignore tpms because they learn quick it is only a tad low, or lights up all the time.

Show some before and after pics if your install please.
 

JayTheCPA

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,654
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989
Location
Annapolis, MD
#5
RV'ers are starting to latch on to TPMS as a gator'd tire can cause more in repairs than the cost of a complete set of new tires. If the driver is able to catch the incident early enough in the cycle, it is possible to limit damage to just the failed tire.

Four years ago I was not so lucky when a tread disintegrated down to the cord and did ~$500 damage to the RV's underbelly. That tire still had good inflation in it.

I got lucky earlier this year when another driver flagged my attention just as one of my TT tires had deflated, started to smoke, and had not shredded or gator'd yet, but most of the cord had separated from the sidewall and a lot of the sidewall had separated from the tread on one side. That incident accelerated my plan change out the wheels to a larger diameter and I splurged on TPMS as well.

The blown tire from this year was replaced four years ago (along with the others) immediately after the disintegration incident. Point is, anybody looking to run ST tires really needs the extra measure of monitoring as ST tire reputation is not as solid as LT.

Granted. TPMS is not an absolute cure to preventing damage as there are cases of catastrophic failure when the tire self-destructs so quickly that the monitoring is merely a notification that the trailer just took a hit. But at least there are plenty of other cases where it allows the driver to stop and prevent damage to the RV. In these cases, the system pays for itself.
 
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