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Hi I am a New member and new to the 6.5 Turbo Town!

WarWagon

Well it hits on 7 of 8...
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PMD has been replaced and relocated under the front bumper. Thanks guys. So far I have done all that and still chasing the P0238 ghost. Next on the list is O2 sensors. That's a hit to a wallet, oh wait it's all been a hit to the wallet. But I love the truck.
So the Red China or made in USA PMD extension cable?

Grounds, grounds, and did we say clean the grounds? Also test the batteries and a corroded positive cable will also wonk out the computer. So are positive cables in good shape?
 

MrMarty51

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Get a vacuum gauge and hook it to the tube that comes from the pump to the boost solenoid, be sure the vacuum is within specs, then, if within specs, hook it to the waste gate actuator with a t and a long enough hose to get the gauge to a position where it can be looked at, take the truck for a drive and see what the vac gauge is telling You.
If the vac pump has good vacuum, and no vacuum at the WG actuator, replace the solenoid, if vac pump is not within specs for Your altitude, then replace the pump.
Oh Yeah, by the way, welcome to thetruckstop Cindy.
 

ak diesel driver

6.5 driver
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Not trying to be critical but when we ask you to check something your supposed to report back as to the results so we can tell you what to check next. Just saying you checked isn't good enough. What were the readings on the vacuum gauge, etc.
You've throws alot of money at a fairly simple fix. We could have steered you in the right direction and you'd have spent alot less time and money.
 

CynTweety

Chevy Silverado 6.5 Turbo Need I say More!!!LOL
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There was a hole in the orange vaccuum line in the picture below. The fuel tank needed replacing due to full of rust. And a fuel line was kinked under the fuel tank. The fuel lift pump went out on a travel trip back home was replaced at a rest area to return home. Temp sensor quit registering on dash gauge. Radiator metal reservoir cap had stripped plastic threads on resevoir so that was replaced. Relays and sensors replaced due to codes. This truck was purchased from a man that didn't drive it for quite some time. So due to none use of vehicle and I'll schedule of maintaining things needed fixed. The truck has 160,000 actual miles and was purchased at a great price. I was aware of some of the issues at purchase. Sorry I didn't realize I should have been more thorough instead just checked. Most of the suggestions I had previously done before posting. Just thought I would see if there was something I had not had checked or repaired or replaced that was causing the code P0238. I didn't mean to cause a critical moment. My apologies.
 

CynTweety

Chevy Silverado 6.5 Turbo Need I say More!!!LOL
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Not trying to be critical but when we ask you to check something your supposed to report back as to the results so we can tell you what to check next. Just saying you checked isn't good enough. What were the readings on the vacuum gauge, etc.
You've throws alot of money at a fairly simple fix. We could have steered you in the right direction and you'd have spent alot less time and money.
The pic is above , not below.
 

ak diesel driver

6.5 driver
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So from my perspective it read like you had done all that stuff chasing the boost code. Also we have no idea how adept a mechanic you are so until we get to know you we're going to assume you don't know much. So the more you let us know the better.
 

CynTweety

Chevy Silverado 6.5 Turbo Need I say More!!!LOL
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Ok. Some of the work I done(not a professional mexhanic) and some of the work was done by a mechanic. Didn't mean to ruffle feathers. Have a Blessed evening. And good night.No sir not just chasing the boost code
 

JayTheCPA

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Temp sensor quit registering on dash gauge.
FWIW, that one is informational only. Put another way, it only feeds the dash gauge where the truck's computer does not care about that one.

The sending unit at the thermostat housing is what feeds the computer. And when that one goes wonky, you will know it as the truck's shift patterns will go crazy.

Along the path of parts, consider getting a monitor from Edge which can display many of the inputs that the computer sees in real-time. I got the Insight and learned to read it and ignore the dash cluster (dash gauges had too many built-in errors).

Reason for the comment about going with a separate gauge monitor is that one of the inputs the Insight can see is coolant temp as measured at the thermostat (and not the one that the dash cluster uses). One night I noticed the transmission up and downshifting gears at highway speed, on flat ground, and with the cruise control activated. Glanced at the Insight and saw coolant temperature (as read by the computer) quickly ranged from normal to 20*'s F. When the temperature dropped, the truck downshifted and visa-versa. The dash guage showed normal coolant temperature as it uses a different sending unit (in the head above #1). Were it not for the Insight, I would likely had thrown money and parts at it, not to mention down-time at the shop to figure it out. But, as I was able to see why the transmission went nuts, I easily did the repair myself.
 
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