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Fuel pressure gauge thread.

MrMarty51

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An electronic vacuum/pressure boost gauge runs in the $250.00 range.
I have not checked the sole purpose pressure gauge.
If the lift pump fails I would like to be able to read what all is going on with the system. Thats why I would very much like to go with the dual purpose unit.
I had removed the analog pressure gauge then the other day when the truck stalled on Me when I was driving home, shoved it to neutral and it fired right back up, it would have been nice to have been able to glance down and read the pressure, or the lack thereof.
 

dbrannon79

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with all the manual gauges, would anyone know why an idolator made for low pressure is so expensive? I don't think there is much to them other than an "in-line" diaphragm with fuel on one side and mineral or baby oil on the other. curiosity has me wondering if we could DIY one and use a boost gauge for the fuel pressure. I may research this idea a bit and see what come about.
 

dbrannon79

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Just some online searching I found this on a site from the UK. looks simple, as if it has a "floating" slug with a seal inside that would slide back n fourth. lol the old gears are turning in my head on how to build one similar for low pressure!!

1631499312935.png
 

dbrannon79

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Ok, I just had a thought. picture a small straight tube sitting upright maybe mounted on the firewall. each end having a fitting for the tiny plastic tubing, the bottom going to the fuel inlet on the IP and the top end going into the cab to the gauge. Ok inside the tube a small spring and above that, a small steel ball or BB. the inside diameter of the straight tube would be maybe 1 or 2 thousands larger than the BB so that it would move freely but allow minimal fluid to bypass it. the top of the tube on the inside of the fitting would be beveled so that when fuel pressure pushed it up to seat in the bevel it would stop the flow of fuel to the gauge for the event of a leak on the gauge or tubing. the straight tube with the BB would need to be long enough so that without leaking, the BB wouldn't contact the seat before the gauge would be maxed out. The purpose of the spring at the bottom is so you would always have a tiny bit of flow back to the IP for in the event of a vacuum situation. now when installing this, you would use a syringe filled with baby oil and fill the entire tubing from the gauge to the IP inlet. Connect everything so it wont leak.


whats everyone's thoughts on this. it's not an isolator so to speak, but a "safety" valve to stop the flow of fuel into the cab if something starts leaking. you would want to re-fill the tubing with baby oil every so oftin just to flush any fuel that would work it's way through. maybe on each oil change or something.
 

Will L.

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Mechanical isolators and electronic pressure sensors are pricey because they are built to withstand modern gasoline with the ethanol in it.

Idk about the bb thing. Save money on the electric gauge set, but spend some of that savings on an isolation device for safety. I ran an 1/8 metal fuel line into my cab, to a mechanical gauge. Never had a problem. But after I saw that go wrong in a diesel- Mine came out immediately. A fine leak sprays everywhere quickly, Simply not worth the risk.
Some things are worth just spending a few bucks on and having it safe.

And use of glycol is better than mineral oil if you can find some. It’s hard to find small quantities
 

Rutjes

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I'm still waiting for a 1/4 to 1/8 NPT adapter to arrive, but I've installed a T right before the IP and have a VDO pressure sender to be installed there. I'm going to wire it to my turbo boost gauge, 0 to 2 bar (0 to about 29 PSI) with a switch in between. This is the VDO gauge I have. €114,20 or $134,38 for both at the moment over here.

Pretty sure VDO is available in the US? And they do make PSI versions of their gauges and senders.
 

jrsavoie

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Mechanical isolators and electronic pressure sensors are pricey because they are built to withstand modern gasoline with the ethanol in it.

Idk about the bb thing. Save money on the electric gauge set, but spend some of that savings on an isolation device for safety. I ran an 1/8 metal fuel line into my cab, to a mechanical gauge. Never had a problem. But after I saw that go wrong in a diesel- Mine came out immediately. A fine leak sprays everywhere quickly, Simply not worth the risk.
Some things are worth just spending a few bucks on and having it safe.

And use of glycol is better than mineral oil if you can find some. It’s hard to find small quantities
I get propylene glycol from the local antifreeze blander.
 

Will L.

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I'm still waiting for a 1/4 to 1/8 NPT adapter to arrive, but I've installed a T right before the IP and have a VDO pressure sender to be installed there. I'm going to wire it to my turbo boost gauge, 0 to 2 bar (0 to about 29 PSI) with a switch in between. This is the VDO gauge I have. €114,20 or $134,38 for both at the moment over here.

Pretty sure VDO is available in the US? And they do make PSI versions of their gauges and senders.
Yes vdo is here in US. Descent quality, but price is up there a little usually- have to see if they have that one in psi.
Just remember your ds4 is 8-14 psi and the db pump on the m1028 is 2-5psi

Please post pictures, sometimes 1 person comes up with a nice way to set them up and others can learn from it.
 

dbrannon79

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I just found a digital boost gauge that will show vacuum on amazon for $20 with lots of good reviews. I would be interested to find out how well it would work with diesel pressure. if I am allowed to I will post the link, let me know please. here is a photo.

1631546209152.png
1631546259108.png1631546280483.png
 

MrMarty51

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I just found a digital boost gauge that will show vacuum on amazon for $20 with lots of good reviews. I would be interested to find out how well it would work with diesel pressure. if I am allowed to I will post the link, let me know please. here is a photo.
That would work nicely, if the diaphragm could withstand the constant contact with the diesel fuel.
 

MrMarty51

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Not over here. British is common. I believe it is standard in water and gas piping, but NPT is rare. Off course, I wanted everything NPT.
Years of working on older Triumph motorcycles, a 1957 Thunderbird and a pre unit Bonneville, taught Me a little about the British Standard wrenches and bolts. My memory has faded, I dont remember if Whitworth was the same as the British Standard, seems they was.
 

Husker6.5

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My fuzzy knowledge from owning a custom '68 Triumph 650 Bonneville chopper and a stock '75 750 Bonneville, as well as working on a couple of pieces of older, British-made, packaging equipment when I was maintenance at the organic cereal plant, is that Whitworth and British Standard are the same thread pitches/thread contour dimensions. And while there are 2-3 cases where Whitworth shares thread pitch with SAE/American (like ⅝"-11, [used for lock rings on microphone stands] or ¼-20 or ⅜-16) while the thread pitch is the same (TPI), the contour of those threads (angle they are cut to make "ridges" and "grooves" from tip to base) are different and they won't interchange.

Hope that makes it clear as mud!
 

MrMarty51

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My fuzzy knowledge from owning a custom '68 Triumph 650 Bonneville chopper and a stock '75 750 Bonneville, as well as working on a couple of pieces of older, British-made, packaging equipment when I was maintenance at the organic cereal plant, is that Whitworth and British Standard are the same thread pitches/thread contour dimensions. And while there are 2-3 cases where Whitworth shares thread pitch with SAE/American (like ⅝"-11, [used for lock rings on microphone stands] or ¼-20 or ⅜-16) while the thread pitch is the same (TPI), the contour of those threads (angle they are cut to make "ridges" and "grooves" from tip to base) are different and they won't interchange.

Hope that makes it clear as mud!
Yuppers, fully understood. 😹😹😹
Several instances, did a slight over bore and tapped with American Standard NC. Always seemed to work good. NC threads grips deeper and tighter than NF, in My opinion.
 

Big T

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My fuzzy knowledge from owning a custom '68 Triumph 650 Bonneville chopper and a stock '75 750 Bonneville, as well as working on a couple of pieces of older, British-made, packaging equipment when I was maintenance at the organic cereal plant, is that Whitworth and British Standard are the same thread pitches/thread contour dimensions. And while there are 2-3 cases where Whitworth shares thread pitch with SAE/American (like ⅝"-11, [used for lock rings on microphone stands] or ¼-20 or ⅜-16) while the thread pitch is the same (TPI), the contour of those threads (angle they are cut to make "ridges" and "grooves" from tip to base) are different and they won't interchange.

Hope that makes it clear as mud!
Did you ever have a Vincent Black Shadow?
 
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