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FASS vs AirDog.....You Decide!

Cumminalong

Doghouse Diesel Performance
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Okay folks, as I like to do whenever I get my hands on two competitive products, here is a review of the latest two.

This will encompass the AirDog 150 and the FASS 150.

I will start off by saying that I like BOTH of them. They both have a few minor points of contention that may make you, the end user, go one way or the other, but I don’t think you can go wrong with either.

Here are the two kits, as they arrived as off the shelf items. Both kits arrived VERY well packaged and complete. Each had a few spare connectors for attaching the pump in different manners.

AirDog 150…..





FASS 150…..





A few things to note about the components….

1 – The FASS comes with 3/8” fuel line and the AirDog comes with 1/2". Both had enough to leave approx 1 – 2’ of fuel line remaining after the install. I like the AirDog’s fuel lines better.

2 – The AirDog comes with much nicer fittings for the fuel lines and the connectors lend themselves well if you decide to use steel braided lines and AN fittings. Both use push lock adapters for the lines and they do require quite a bit of pressure to get them fully seated. I suggest using a heat gun on low to warm and soften the line and a little bit of oil on the fitting to aid getting the hoses on.





3 – The FASS comes with a steel pick up tube and the AirDog comes with a plastic one. Both were long and required cutting to the appropriate length. The AirDog pick up tube is easier to work with for the home installer that may not have metal cutting tools. The FASS tube can easily be cut with a hack saw, cutoff wheel, etc.

Regardless of which one you use, you want to leave AT LEAST 1/8” gap from the bottom of the tank and I SUGGEST that you fish mouth the tube to prevent possible suction to the tank bottom. To fish-mouth the AirDog, just use a sharp knife and cut the end of the tube at a 45* angle. To fish-mouth the FASS tube, just use a drill bit and drill a half circle at the end of the tube.

4 – Both come with a pair of steel, powder coated brackets for attaching to the frame. The FASS comes with a bracket that is specific to the model of vehicle, the AirDog is more generic, but allows more flexibility for user preferred install location. For ease of installation, I prefer the FASS setup, but for flexibility, I prefer the AirDog setup. This is your choice here. Also, the FASS comes with a rubber isolator pad that goes between the bracket and frame for noise / vibration isolation.





5 – The FASS comes with ENORMOUS filters compared to the AirDog. They are EASILY 1.5 times the size of the AirDog filters. These filters are also easily cross referenced with other filter manufacturer’s types if you prefer to switch them to different type. I swapped mine for hydraulic filters that had a much lower micron rating (2 micron) and had much thicker case for higher burst pressures. If limited space is a consideration, the AirDog is a much smaller unit and fits the bill. For longer intervals between filter changes and filter availability, the FASS might be a better choice.





6 – The AirDog is MUCH quieter than the FASS on my truck. The FASS sounds like a small lawnmower engine before the truck is started. Once the truck is started, it’s noticeable outside, but not on the inside. It actually works as a little conversation piece when folks hear it for the first time.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=__ExJM_LnrQ

7 – Wiring. Both are similar, with the exception that the FASS does not require cutting the power wire to the OEM pump. If for some reason it was necessary to use the OEM pump, it’s much easier to swap on the side of the road with the FASS, as no electrical connection need to be spliced.



8 – PRICE! The Airdog is much cheaper than the FASS, so this will likely be a major consideration in your purchase.

All in all, I like them both. I’ve installed several of both and I’d use either without hesitation. Both have a few items that are better than the other, but nothing that should prevent someone from purchasing either.
 

Cumminalong

Doghouse Diesel Performance
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I actually like the sound of it at start up.

I use it as a bit of joke with folks that haven't heard it before.

When it kicks on and someone looks at it funny, I tell them it's the APU (Auxillary Power Unit......like what aircraft have to run their power and start). I tell them the stock starting system doesn't have enough power to turn it over so it has a second engine.

They look at it like, WTF?.....):h
 

Acesneights1

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So I ordered my Raptor 100 and a nice Autometer full sweep Fuel pressure gauge with 1/2 pillar from Jim at Upstate Diesel. Can't wait till it gets here. He actually had a nice ISSpro for about 50$ cheaper but I'm stubborn and like Autometer.
 

Cumminalong

Doghouse Diesel Performance
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Cool!

Those are THE two most important things you can do on a 2nd Gen.....

Good lift pump and a fuel pressure guage.

:thumbsup:

Shoulda just added EGT and trans guages while you were at it and you'd be golden.
 

Cumminalong

Doghouse Diesel Performance
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I know I was thinking it but funds are real tight right now.
I hear ya.

As long as you aren't running a hot tune or dragging 10K+ in the mountains, you can hold off on those two.

Although, they would be my VERY NEXT purchase.

The one thing I always tell guys, NO POWER MOD'S WITHOUT GAUGES!

If someone asks me to install any power adders on their truck and they don't have a set of gauges, I won't touch it. They may get pissed off, but they'll be more pissed off it they burn a hole in a piston or thier turbo blows apart or they blow a head gasket, etc.

Gauges first, then play toys.

:thumbsup:
 

gmctd

Diesels, Anonymous
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FYI: Fass and Airdog are designed by a father and son team - one designed his unit for 18-wheelers - other designed his unit for the Dodges and such - similar concepts, different implementation, both help to eliminate fuel aeration - totally unnecessary on everyday street trucks, they were offered during the dark times of the failed VP44 scare due to early oem lift pump failure - Dodge finally yielded to that 1998 mis-design in 2005 by relocating the lift pump to inside the fuel tank, where pushing fuel is several orders of magnitude less problematical than 'sucking' fuel - Dodge currently offers an in-tank conversion kit for those '98-'04 trucks - however, F and A both serve to satisfy the 'mine's bigger'n yers' syndrome................
 

Acesneights1

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I saw pics of the Dodge updated in tank. Not very impressive. I agree that the aeration system is probably more than I need which is why I didn't buy it but I think the Raptor was a good investment.
 

Cumminalong

Doghouse Diesel Performance
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FYI: Fass and Airdog are designed by a father and son team - one designed his unit for 18-wheelers - other designed his unit for the Dodges and such - similar concepts, different implementation, both help to eliminate fuel aeration - totally unnecessary on everyday street trucks, they were offered during the dark times of the failed VP44 scare due to early oem lift pump failure - Dodge finally yielded to that 1998 mis-design in 2005 by relocating the lift pump to inside the fuel tank, where pushing fuel is several orders of magnitude less problematical than 'sucking' fuel - Dodge currently offers an in-tank conversion kit for those '98-'04 trucks - however, F and A both serve to satisfy the 'mine's bigger'n yers' syndrome................
That's not 100% correct.

There was a huge fued between the two which caused a split, copyright issues, some subsequent lawsuits and eventually a patent decision in court. The father / son "team" is not friendly.

Now, as far as them being unecessary on an everyday street truck, that's not quite accurate either.

Just moving the pump to the fuel was done due to the vibration from the engine killing the pumps and subsequently the VP44's. The intank pumps "helped", but didn't eliminate the problem. The actual design of the pump is a splash system and get's taxed very quickly. You can easily drop the OEM intank pump down to 0 psi with mild mods.

The other thing that the OEM system doesn't do is remove ANY of the entrained air in the fuel. The OEM pumps are great in a stationary test, where the fuel tank is stable and higher than the pump and the fuel is not subject to aeration from both sloshing and fuel coming in from the return sytem.

There's plent of benefit to using a FASS or AirDog on a regular, street driven truck. Is it overkill in MOST situations? Yes, a Raptor or DDRP will work just fine.
 
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