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Gas for 1965 Ford 2000 Petrol tractor.

schiker

Well-Known Member
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Location
Pendleton, SC
Thread starter #1
A guy asked me what gas to use in his 4 cyl gas tractor and I said I'd run ethanol free with some seafoam in it and might buy some of the Lead additives I use to see at part stores.

I googled it for others opinion and first few hits came back that the lead substitute was snake oil and a substitute anyway. So I think Seafoam would be enough top cylinder lube and gas stabilizer wouldn't it?

I remember hearing the lead helped lube the valve seats of old carburetor'ed leaded gas cars (and some of the same hits from above search seem to confirm that). Does it do anything else? Will modern unleaded gas foul out plugs of a 1965 gas tractor w/o some light oil in it like Seafoam?

My friend said he added some typical pump gas (87 octane ethanol gas) and the tractor is running rough. Does he need an octane booster or just seafoam and maybe non-ethanol.

I put Seafoam in my non-ethanol gas for lawn mowers, small engines etc, and boat. Sometimes I use Amsoil gas additive and my boat seems to runs a little better on the gas plus Amsoil (or at least I like Amsoil and think it makes a tad bit of difference).
 

btfarm

330,000 Worth and counting
Staff member
Lead Moderator
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Location
Sandwich, Illinois
Staff #3
I used to run a product called 'Valve Save' from my fuel supplier when they no longer carried leaded regular. My supplier then said it's no longer available and stopped putting it in my 300 gal overhead tank. My concern was for the 3 cylinder gas Ford 2000 and older JD lawn tractors. I've been running RUG now in everything for a good 15+ years with no issues except the carbs and fuel lines on small 2 cycle equipment. I have been putting treatment for ethanol fuel in the storage tank for the last few years and that seems to help.
 

btfarm

330,000 Worth and counting
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Sandwich, Illinois
Staff #4
All gas in Illinois is 10% ethanol. This being a huge farming state. Almost ALL diesel is B5 to B20 and has been for a good 10 years for the same reason. And I'm good with that because I'm pretty certain that has a lot to do with why the entire fuel system of my truck is still OEM and continuing to run as good as ever.
 
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Location
Rural Clifton, Illinois
#5
I run mostly B-11 in my diesels and have been since it was available to be delivered to the house. A friend that runs straight diesel filled up out of my off road tank and plugged all his filters. He swore off ever using bio right then.

I've never had an issue. I started the 1st tank at 3 or 4% and worked my way up to 11% over a few tank fulls. Never had anything but normal fuel filter changes.

I run 89 octane no bio gasoline. FS delivers it on request. It's not much more in price.

I've had problems with the alcohol absorbing water in the storage tank. The straight 89 octane seems to hold up better. I use 89 because something I have calls for it. I don't remember what that was, but I just keep doing the same thing.

Most of what we have is diesel - except the weed whackers, power washer, Generator, rototiller and 1980 John Deere 400 garden tractor with Kohler K582 23 hp.
 

Will L.

Well-Known Member
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Location
Boulder City Nv
#6
The alcohols in the gas give artificial ummf. Richen the gas mixture and adjust timing accordingly.
Depending on the carburetor will change how much timing to add.
Alcohols absorbs moisture, and carburetors are more susceptible to water in gas than injection gas engines for running rough. But the water actually does more damage to the injectors than the carburetor.

Different engines get different results with brand A/B/C additives. All he can do is ensure the alcohol isn’t making it run to lean- that is the effect alcohols cause. Then experiment with lube additives for best results.
Carb seals, valve guides and seals, rings all suffer from loss of lead.
Without the lead we will all live longer to watch more engines of old die from lack of lube. Good for you, not for your heirs.
 
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