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CB750 - decent for tall beginner rider?

treegump

Romans 3:22-24
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Trying to get rid of a 1986 F150 farm truck and came across a CB750.

Supposedly the carbs need rebuilt, but I think I'll try tuning them first. But, if they do need rebuilt, it looks like it wouldn't be too difficult, just time consuming.

I've ridden a lot of bicycles (not same thing obviously), had a dirtbike for a short time, and may just try to trade the CB750 for something smaller - maybe this'll be a go between

Anyhow, what are your thoughts. I'd love to turn a motorcycle, eventually, into a scrambler so that it's a more "dual sport". My buddy keeps trying to convince me to get more of an enduro, but i love the look of some of these old cruisers..

here's the link: http://indianapolis.craigslist.org/mcy/5745710994.html
 

JayTheCPA

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CB750 is a nice platform. For $900 and not running well, the price seems a bit high. I would not learn on it as it is fairly heavy with lots of torque. More on that platform in a minute.


For learning, consider something no more than a 500 cc for a couple of years. Actually, something in the 250 - 400 cc range is a good place to start even with the personal height. Reasoning is that the entry costs are lower with less sting if you drop it and the lighter weight makes it much more agile.

Seeing as you are new to biking, a key thing to grasp quickly is that there is a *lot* more to it than just learning how to keep your feet on the pedals at all times. Learning how to:
- identify a car driver's behavior within a fraction of a second,
- maximize the length of time that you have to identify the presence of a car and how long to potential impact,
- never hang in another vehicle's blind spot,
- avoid riding in the rain or at night (read: *never* while learning),
- constantly scan every inch of the road for imperfections (cracks, debris, gravel, etc) while doing everything else,
- change the seating position while turning to maximize tire patch contact with the road, and
- constantly recognize that you are 100% invisible to other drivers, all the time
will maximize the opportunity of getting to the status of an old biker.

Highly recommend subscribing to Motorcycle Consumer News and read at least the past two years of back issues.



Toward the CB750. If it has 4 independent carbs (which from the picture it looks like the generation that does), they might need rebuilt, they just might need some carb cleaner run through them and then get the air mixtures balanced, or they might be shot from water in the fuel. Getting all 4 of the carbs in sync is best left for a mechanic with experience as it is a real pain for a DIY'er without experience. Best to find either a Honda shop or an indi shop that specializes in Honda's.

It might have come with a tool kit to do basic roadside repairs. The tool kit storage was accessed from one of the plastic side panels.

Even with that 750's weight, it still has good handling manners. At a minimum, consider a cafe wind screen. And learn how to use 'ear-plugs' to avoid tinnis.

One thing to watch is that IIRC that motor needs 93 octane, so you will likely need to either find a supplier or brew some with additives. Oh, and it might need lead additive too.

If it was built prior to today's corn-mix fuel, do not know how well that system handles today's crapoline. That might be part of the comment about rebuilding the carbs.

When you get it running properly, it is a fun beast ;)
 

ak diesel driver

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that's the "F" version (sport) I had the Custom. Great bike great engines. If you survive learning how to ride a bike you WILL be a defensive driver. Syncing the carbs is actually pretty easy just need 4 vacuum gauges.
 

treegump

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Thanks guys!

I'm 6'3" 160 lbs, so I'm not so much interested in the heavier or larger cc bikes, but more so want something that my 34" inseam will fit comfortably.

And I'm a rather defensive driver now - having driven everything from a jeep cherokee to a semi truck to Farm equipment - and from cities to country - I know how other drivers can be. I'm sure going to be careful..

But my F150 trade is a ROUGH farm truck, so he may not go for it.. May need to keep looking for something else.
 
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