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Additives for tank when in storage

SnowDrift

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Yesterday, we received the first snowfall of the season for us, which means a call to our insurance company to remove insurance. I had hoped to drive through the end of November, but my little gasser truck will be taking the baton from here until the salt is off the roads in the spring.

Is there something I should consider adding to the fuel for my truck's winter hibernation routine? Normally, I just top it off as full as the tank can be and let it go, at that.
 

schiker

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I use Biobor and have used Stabil for Diesel when I store Diesel.

Biobor JF Diesel
Diesel Biocide and Lubricity Additive - The Worldwide Standard
• Kills microbial growth in diesel fuel
• Adds lubricity to ultra-low sulfur fuels
• Prevents clogged filters
• Prevents corrosion
• Military Spec MIL-S-53021A
• Kills in both water and fuel
 

schiker

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West Marine in Anderson has Biobor. I think Diesel Power on White horse Rd. in Greenville has Biobor iirc. They are a Stanadyne shop. I have bought Diesel Stabil at Tractor Supply in Anderson.

Its expensive and you only use a tiny bit.

Several additives help stabilize fuel but only true Biocides are the bug killers/retard growth. From reading I believe there are 2 major types and you should alternate occasionally.
 

Will L.

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Completely light free storage helps a ton.
The plastic tanks in pickups are slightly translucent allowing sunlight in and promote the growth. Old school metal tanks block the sunlight and don’t allow growth. Thats why it doesn’t grow in the tanks at fuel stations. Some tanks are now being done with fully sealed fill caps to ensure no sunlight penitrates and the vent lines are being built with off sets to block all uv light travel.

I have been contemplating making a new main fuel tank from fear of bugs. But since almost no one in Southern Nevada has the problem, I don’t bother.

The other common err in fuel storage is being sealed. You want it air tight. The lighter molecules will off gas and escape. No one want the gurgle of the drinking water bottle effect, however that is better for never allowing the vapors to escape.
Depending how large a storage tank and how long it is stored becomes the question of cost vs reward.

In the pickup if you store fuel a long time, yes a 100% full tank is best. On the no uv light issue, maybe painting the tank black is worth while. Vented fuel caps have their place, but unless your tank and fill line has no room for expansion- and your truck is stored where temperature fluctuations are big enough to cause swelling and shrinking of the tank- get the sealed cap on there for storage and just put the center cap in a ziplock baggie on the driver’s seat so when it’s time to revive, it isn’t forgotten.

Btw, a finger tip wipe of oil on fuel cap o rings extends their life a lot. Many classic cars in storage people simply spray wd40 on all the rubber parts like the hoses, belts, tires, etc. it soaks in slowly and forms a barrier that slows the outgassing of the hydrocarbons.
 
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