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Piston coating

Twisted Steel Performance

Formerly: sctrailrider
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Thread starter #1
The piston is one of the very first parts that should be considered for coating. Coating the piston reduces friction and wear, reduces part operating temperature, can increase horsepower and torque, reduce or eliminate detonation, allow higher compression ratios to be utilized and allow tighter piston to wall clearances for a better ring seal.

Pistons can be coated with three different systems. They are, Dry Film Lubricants, Thermal Barriers and an oil shedding. These systems can be beneficial on all pistons whether 4 stroke, 2 stroke, gas, alcohol, diesel, reciprocal or rotary.

We will look at the Thermal Barrier coatings first. Either CBC2 or CBX may be applied. CBX is recommended for all High Compression (13:1 and higher), Turbo Charged, Super Charged, or engines running Nitrous Oxide. CBC2 should be run on all other engines. Both CBC2 and CBX insulate the piston against damaging heat transfer, keeping more of the heat generated by combustion, pushing down on the piston for greater power. By retaining minimal heat on the surface of the piston less heat is transferred to the incoming fuel mixture, leading to a reduction in pre-ignition which leads to detonation. The coatings can also allow heat at the surface to move more evenly over the surface reducing hot spots and the coatings reflect heat into the chamber for more even distribution of heat, allowing more efficient combustion of the fuel. This allows more of the fuel molecules to be oxidized, which in turn, means less fuel is needed for optimum power. The result is an engine that makes more power, can be run with a leaner air fuel mix and less initial timing and has less thermal expansion due to a reduction in the heat absorbed.

By applying a dry film lubricant friction, galling and wear is reduced. The lubricants are capable of carrying loads beyond the crush point of the piston. In addition the lubricants are “fluid retaining” materials that actually hold oil to the surface beyond the pressure where the oil would normally be squeezed off. The ability to carry greater loads, up to 350,000 PSI, while increasing lubricity (reduced friction) allows tighter piston to wall clearances to be run. This leads to better sealing with no increase in friction.

By applying Tech Line’s TLTD to the underside of the piston, oil that is splashed onto the piston to cool it will shed rapidly. Heat transfers most rapidly when there is a large difference in temperature. The longer oil clings to a hot surface the hotter the oil becomes. By shedding the cooling oil more rapidly, cooler oil is splashed over the surface, more frequently. If the oil “hangs” longer, it absorbs less heat and blocks cooler oil from contacting the hot surface. A cooler piston grows less, allowing tighter piston to wall clearances.

The following coatings are recommended for pistons: DFL-1, TLML, CermaLube (Highly recommended), CBC2, CBX and TLTD.
 

Twisted Steel Performance

Formerly: sctrailrider
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Thread starter #3
Nice! Have you ever coated any 2 stroke chainsaw pistons? Does it add thickness to the piston? If so, how much? Does the coating last against the chromed or nikasil cylinder?
I have done 2 stroke pistons, a chainsaw would be a first, as for holding up it will, and the skirt coating will hold the oil that is suspended in the gas and help guard against piston galling that leads to seizing.. The top coating would slow heat transfer to the piston.. These coatings when applied correctly will only be .0003" thick at the most, the skirt coating will burnish to near 0 and they both bond at the micro level with the part...
 

Will L.

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#4
Just my .02 but all the stats I read of years ago having the oil shed faster and friction reducers on contact surfaces helped rpm. Been told rpm is the name of the game on chainsaws.

Friction Coating chain would probably be waste of time, but what about runner on the bar?
 

Twisted Steel Performance

Formerly: sctrailrider
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Your right Will, I have preached that for years now, seems the only people that believe in coatings are race shops that got on the wagon years ago and most all of them keep everything a secret from others... On a 2stroke coating the under side of a piston would help with cooling the piston also, how cool a chainsaw piston needs to be I don't know... I do know coating the outside of the head would help loads with cooling, same thing is done on motor cycles...
 

Will L.

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#6
Seems to me most everyone educated on race engines knows. But using the advantages for hard working street rigs or trying to simply get longer life is slow coming. Think about how long it took for most people to understand fully synthetic oils help. It was around for ever on the race track first. Funny thing imo is nitrogen filled tires caught on fairly quick.

Heck, think about the 6.2s and first 6.5s- NO TURBO?!? It took GM years to get dragged along and only add a turbo after seeing the profit they were loosing out to Gale Banks. People just get stuck on “good enough”. I get it though, I didn’t have the cash to do my optimizer when I got it. Didn’t bother with my pickup 6.5s cuz I new they were not going to be around more than a couple years each.
 

schiker

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#9
One day I would like to get an engine built with coated pistons. I think the 6.5 is a prime candidate for it.
Interesting about the underside coating. I mistakenly thought to myself the underside coating was mostly for windage and it might slightly retard the splash/spray cooling.
 

Twisted Steel Performance

Formerly: sctrailrider
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Thread starter #10
One day I would like to get an engine built with coated pistons. I think the 6.5 is a prime candidate for it.
Interesting about the underside coating. I mistakenly thought to myself the underside coating was mostly for windage and it might slightly retard the splash/spray cooling.
It really improves the cooling a lot..
 
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